Post-Traumatic stress disorder, otherwise known as PTSD, is an anxiety disorder a person may experience following a traumatic event involving personal injury or the threat of death, causing terror, hopelessness, and fear. It is estimated that out of a million troops deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq, approximately three hundred thousand have come back with some form of PTSD. And those are just the reported cases.

According to the (NIMH) National Institute of Mental Health, about thirty percent of soldiers who have spent time in war zones, not just Afghanistan and Iraq, have experienced PTSD for varying length of time. An even more alarming statistic is that nearly eight million Americans have the symptoms of Post-traumatic stress at any given time. Most of the PTSD sufferers have never been in an actual war zone, but PTSD has no borders.

Trauma is something that most of us will be forced to cope with at some point in our life journey. In fact, it’s estimated that between fifty to ninety percent of us will have to cope with it at one point or another.

Symptoms of PTSD

Having stress reactions following a traumatic event is normal. Your behavior and emotions can change in ways that are upsetting to you. Although most people have stress reactions following trauma, they get better in time. However, you should seek help if symptoms disrupt your home or work life, last longer than three months, or cause you a lot of distress.

The specific symptoms can vary widely between individuals but generally fall into the categories listed below:

Flashbacks and Reliving the Event

Flashbacks are probably the most common symptom of PTSD. This is when a person vividly and involuntarily re-experiences the traumatic event in the form of:

  • Distressing and repetitive sentences or images
  • Nightmares
  • Physical sensation like trembling, sweating and pain
  • Flashbacks

Emotional Numbing and Avoidance

A vast majority with PTSD simply try to ignore the traumatic event, and push it out of their mind, frequently distracting themselves with work. Other individuals attempt to deal with their emotions by trying not to feel anything. This is recognized as emotional numbing. This can lead to the person becoming withdrawn and isolated.

Feeling on the Edge

Someone with PTSD may be very uneasy and find it hard to relax. They may be aware of threats and easily startled. This state of mind is known as hyperarousal. Hyperarousal can often lead to angry outbursts, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, and irritability

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis of this condition is normally done through a physiological exam. The criteria include two hyperarousal symptoms, three avoidance symptoms and at least one re-experiencing symptom. The symptoms must be intense enough to interfere with your routine activities.

Fortunately, there is a myriad of ways anxiety attacks can be treated. Outpatient and therapy prescription Medicare are means that have long since been proven to be a success. Those that are suffering from this condition should seek medical advice from a qualified medical healthcare professional to discuss various treatment options.

There are many types of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. You and your doctor will discuss the best treatment for you. You may have to try some treatments before you find one that works for you. Treatment, however, is usually a combination of resolution of ongoing traumas and talk therapy.

Psychotherapy in conjunction with medications has been shown to be very effective for the treatment of this condition. You don’t have to suffer in silence. There is help if you feel you’re experiencing PTSD.

Conclusion

The good news is that there is hope for those who suffer from PTSD. The first step for soldiers returning or any veteran suffering from PTSD is to go to their local Veterans Hospital and get the diagnosis. PTSD is very common in those who have served in the armed forces and can occur as the result of any trauma in life. Help is available.

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